Goodness Gracious! Great Balls of Smoke?

Smoked Mozzarella

Holy Smokes!

Having made my own mozzarella, I got a little bolder with my cheese, and decided that I should smoke it. I was given a hot smoker for my birthday and I was going to use it. A quick scour of the internet later, and again mostly inspired by The Barefoot Kitchen Witch, I realised that all of the smoking is done in a cold smoker, which I don’t have. Not one to be put off by such things, I thought that I could rig something up with the hot smoker, to do just as well. So the Big Guy and I put our heads together and decided upon what I still think is a very good bodge job.

As you can see from the photo above, I didn’t quite manage it, but I am onto something, and think with a few more goes I could get it right. The lovely round balls on the right here are scamorza that I bought from the market to try to determine what wood they use for the smoke. I managed to make great discs of smoke, rather than the balls I’d hoped would be there.However, the smoke flavour was very good, and so I was happy enough with the result.

So, in case you are ever mad enough to try hot smoking cheese yourself, this is how I did it.

Improvising a cold smoker from a hot one

Smoking Rig

Firstly, I knew I had to elevate the cheese as far away from the flame as I could, while still being within the realm that I could feasibly wrap in foil, which I would need to seal in the smoke, because the lid would not allow me to elevate the cheese. I have a small shopping basket thing that I was given one Christmas. It’s supposed to be a kitchen or bathroom tidy, but was metal and grill shaped, so perfect for my needs. You could also use the racks you find in combi microwaves, or invent your own bodge job.

Alder and Oak chips for smoking mozzarella

Smoking Mix

For the smoking mix, I thought that I’d chance my arm with a mix of alder and oak chips. I wanted all oak smoke, which is stronger, but I also needed something to have enough size to keep smoking when I turned off the heat source – because the cheese really would not hold up to continuous heat. As you can see from the photo, the oak chips on the top are really small, and I couldn’t be sure that they would continue to smoke without help, so I added the alder in an attempt to keep it smoking for longer.

Concertinering foil to make a larger smoker

Concertina Action

We tried to wrap the foil using the lip around the smoker, but could not get a good enough seal, so we decided that we would have to wrap the whole smoker up in a parcel. To seal the seams, we had to concertina long strips of foil, large enough to encase the smoker. We needed four widths, so it is a lot more foil than you think you will need.

A Frame for the cheese to rest on

A is for Almost an A Frame

Then I rigged up the cheese platform. I draped a simple piece of cheesecloth over the kitchen tidy, butI didn’t want the foil to fall in on the cheese, in case it conducted heat straight onto it.  So, I rigged up a kind of A-frame with some chopsticks, and I placed some pastry dough scraps I had leftover from cooking an apple pie over the top to prevent them piercing the foil.

Foil wrapped smoker

Fumer en Papillote

Then I wrapped the whole thing in foil, and sealed it tightly by scrunching up the edges. I put it on the smallest hob on my stove, and heated gently to make the smoke start. When the smell of smoke was pretty strong, I would turn off the heat, and just allow the cheese to sit in the smoke that was created. When I could no longer smell the smoke, about every 10-15 minutes, I would turn the heat on again, for a few minutes, and then let the cheese sit in the smoke again. I did this for 2 hours.

After an hour, I checked the cheese by opening a little of one seam and shining a torch into the gap. They were definitely still whole and plump and round then. I think that the problem was that in the second hour, I got distracted by cutting up toppings for the pizzas, and the heat may have stayed on a little longer than I had hoped for a couple of the times. I think if I make sure that I am not distracted, and leave the heat on for no more than two minutes each time, then I will be more successful.

Cheese Please blog badge

I was very pleased with the smoke, and I would use the smoke mix again. The flavour was rich, but not overwhelming. And I still believe that the gentle heat and then allowing the cheese to sit will work, maybe I need to experiment with the total time that the cheeses smoke for. However, I want to enter this to Cheese, Please! hosted by Fromage Homage, and so I have posted these very tasty smoke discs, in order to qualify in time.

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13 Comments

Filed under Feast

13 responses to “Goodness Gracious! Great Balls of Smoke?

  1. petra08

    It sounds delicious and so innovative! 🙂 I can imagine they tasted lovely!

    • They did. I’m definitely going to try them again, but next time maybe do it over a much longer period, so I can be sure both the heat and the smoke have dissipated before I add heat again. That way, I should keep the ball shape, instead of melting them.

  2. It’s great fun using a smoker, isn’t it? We’ve got a little hot smoker but I’m hoping our next big engineering project will be to make a cold smoker from a leaky barrel! Love the idea of smoky pizas, yum.

    • It is great fun. I am pretty confident that I can sort out the heat too, so I can have smoked mozzarella balls. Will you be blogging about your cold smoker efforts? I’d love to see more about how you make one. It could be the next thing that I try.
      Look out for the pizzas too, they’ll be appearing in a post near you very soon 😉

  3. Ooh lovely. I bought some smoked mozzarella from a farmers’ market last year and used it in a chipotle cornbread recipe – very nice. Have you heard of the Punk Domestics site? It’s a great way to share any sort of posts about ‘making and preserving stuff’. Thanks for sharing this with Cheese, Please! this month 🙂

    • No I haven’t heard of them until now, it sounds like it is right up my street, especially if they are happy to take massively lucky bodge jobs too. Thanks for that info, I’m heading over there to check them out now.

  4. Pingback: March’s Cheese, Please! Recipe Blog Challenge – Fresh Cheese | Fromage Homage

  5. afracooking

    HIhi – you are on “fire”!

  6. Pingback: March’s Cheese, Please! Challenge Round-Up – Fresh Cheese | Fromage Homage

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