Aye Crumble!

Apple Crumble and Custard

A Faithful Friend

Today’s post is for my Brother Out-Law (since the Big Guy and I are not married, otherwise he would be my in-law!). Whenever I need a relatively simple dessert, that I can ย make up quickly, but that can sit in the oven while we eat a main course, I always fall back on a crumble. Good, comforting, and a great way of using up fruit if you find yourself with a glut; or if you were tempted at the market, but now they are sitting there looking sad, and you need something to use them up with.

I made a pear and apple crumble for the Big Guy’s sister and her family for just such an occasion over Christmas. They asked if I would be blogging the recipe. At first, I resisted, because it is a common dessert. Except, it is a common British Dessert (and in the US, where it is called a Crisp, for reasons I am unable to fathom). It was quickly pointed out that a lot of different people read my blog, including my Swedish family, and they may not think it that common. So, I relented, and here is my version of crumble.

Let’s be honest, crumble is never going to be fine dining, but it is always a great dish to have as a standby for when you need to serve up a tasty dessert.

You can, and probably should, serve a crumble with ice cream, custard or pouring cream. I served this one for dessert after the Beer Can Chicken with some warm, thick custard that I made up using my usual custard methodology. This may have been served in the Netherlands, but you really can’t get more British than that.

Made with Love Mondays

Since I always make crumble and custard from scratch, and always with a lot of love, I’m going to add this to this week’s Made with Love Mondays, hosted by Mark at Javelin Warrior. I haven’t joined this in quite a while, but I always enjoy the posts.

Ingredients
For the crumble:
120 g plain flour
40 g cold butter
50 g rolled oats (you may need a bit more if you use cut oats, for texture)
50 g nuts, roughly chopped
3 tbsp demerara sugar
Fruit of your choice
Butter to grease the dish and dot on the top of the crumble
For the custard:
2oo ml double cream
150 ml milk
1 vanilla pod
4 egg yolks
65 g caster sugar

Method

Rubbing in the Flour and the Butter

Rubbing in the Flour and the Butter

Make the crumble mix. Cut the butter into small cubes, and add to the flour and then rub into the flour, using your fingers and thumbs. Keep going until they look like fine breadcrumbs.

Flour and butter at the fine breadcrumb stage

Stop When the Mixture Looks Like This

You can use rolled or cut oats in this mix, but since their inclusion is as much about texture as they are about flavour, you will need more if you use cut oats.

Roughly chopped nuts

Roughly Chopped for Texture

You can also use whatever nuts you like, or leave them out altogether if you prefer. I have happily used whole almonds, blanched, or flaked, hazelnuts and macadamia nuts. I’ve also used pumpkin seeds, although these burn a bit easier than nuts. I’m confident that walnuts, pecans or brazil nuts will work just as well. They do not top my list of favourite nuts, so I rarely have them in the house.

This another one of those recipes where you can play fairly fast and loose with what you add. For a real crumble you must have the flour, butter and sugar. I personally think that oats are essential, although this may be controversial in some quarters. In fact, I have also used muesli at a push, which I substituted for both the oats and the nuts. I did remove the dried grapes, because the layers you use are thin, and the currants/ raisins will burn. I dislike burnt currants, but you may be of a different opinion, in which case, use muesli and leave the dried grapes in to your heart’s desire.

Add the rest of the ingredients to the flour and butter, except one tbsp of the sugar, and mix thoroughly.

Then, grease an oven proof dish well with butter. Place large chunks of fruit across the base of the dish in a single layer. Again, it is pretty much anything goes. You can use a single fruit, like the traditional apple, or more unusual peach. You can mix it up; combinations like rhubarb and strawberry, or apple and pear work well. I have added chopped crystallised ginger, and herbs and spices. What you add is up to you. If you are adding fruits that will exude a lot of liquid, such as rhubarb, plums or peaches, then you may find stirring a tablespoon of plain flour through the fruit before you put it in the dish will help stop the juices soaking into the crumble topping, and leaving you with a steaming bowl of soggy disappointment.

Pre-Baked Crumble

Pre-Baked Crumble

Sprinkle the crumble topping over the fruit in a thin layer. It needs to coat the fruit, but not be too thick, or it will be claggy when you come to eat it. If there is any topping leftover, don’t worry, this mixture freezes really well, and you can save it for a time when you want to make a smaller crumble – maybe one just for yourself, made in a smaller pot or ramekin. Sprinkle the remaining tablespoon of sugar over the crumble, and dot here and there with a little butter.

Put in the centre of the hot oven, and bake for 30-40 minutes, or until the fruit is cooked, and topping is golden brown. If you have quick cooking fruit, cook in the oven until the fruit is done, then finish browning the topping under the grill.

Serve warm with custard or ice cream.

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14 Comments

Filed under Feast

14 responses to “Aye Crumble!

  1. I’ll turn turn down a good crumble – and I love the combination of pears and apples. I’m not sure why we in the US call it a crisp, but it might have to do with achieving a crisp crumble. Because to me, that’s about the best part ๐Ÿ˜‰

  2. Fig & Quince

    My sister makes a version of this as well when looking to please a crowd in a hurry and I always love it. Yours looks delicious. I also loved the out-law coinage! ha ha

    • Yes, it is a crowd pleaser, isn’t it? I’m not sure where I got the out-law moniker, but it amuses me, and the out-laws are used to me and my quirky English by now ๐Ÿ™‚

  3. Great stuff! You have a very amazing bake!

  4. petra08

    I love a good crumble! Your looks like I would like to get a spoon and just start eating straight away! ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. Mmmmm crumble! Have you tried it with tinned peaches? That reminds me I’ve got frozen plums in the freezer- ‘Plum crumble tonight every one’ ๐Ÿ˜€ x

  6. I’ve never made crumble before. I’m glad you mentioned rhubarbs because we have a rhubarb patch in our garden. I’ve made rhubarb jam or “confituur” and rhubarb cupcakes and not anything else. A bit boring, I know..I’m not Queen of the bakes but would love to give a go at something “new” ๐Ÿ˜„ . Thanks for the recipe

    • Thank you Nasifriet. I promise, crumble is a really great bake. With rhubarb, I’d recommend a little flour with the fruit, so it doesn’t get too soggy. Maybe a little chopped up stem ginger with the fruit would be superb too. An extra spoonful of sugar in the fruit probably wouldn’t go amiss either.
      I have quite a few rhubarb recipes too, if you have a look in the recipe index. I love rhubarb, I can’t wait until I have enough for the first crop. I’ve only got two stalks up at the moment. I have big plans for this year’s crop too.

  7. Pingback: Homemade Fragrant Prawn Tomato Sambal โ€“ A Perfect Recipe! | By the way ...

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